Related Topics of Learning Disability 

LEARNING DISABILITY

This is an effort to share some basic information about Learning Disability. It is intended to provide a starting point, specific issues in more detail will have to be investigated from other sources.

These children fall into 2 broad categories

  • Underachievers who do not have any underlying physiological problem. These children have learning gaps primarily as a result of visual, hearing, or motor handicaps; or emotional disturbance; environmental, cultural or economic disadvantages.

  • Underachievers who do have an underlying physiological problem. These are children who have Special Needs… A Learning Disability

Millions of children struggle in school daily because of serious learning problems.

The term “Learning Disabilities” is an “umbrella” term describing a number of other, more specific learning disabilities. It is a neurological disorder that affects one or more of the basic psychological processes involved in understanding or in using spoken or written language. The disability may manifest itself in an imperfect ability to listen, think, speak, read, write, and spell or to do mathematical calculations.

Generally speaking, people with learning disabilities are of average or above average intelligence. There often appears to be a gap between the individual's potential and actual achievement. This is why learning disabilities are referred to as “hidden disabilities:” the person looks perfectly “normal” and may seem to be a very bright and intelligent person, yet may be unable to demonstrate the skill level expected from someone of a similar age.

A common characteristic among people with learning disabilities is uneven areas of ability, “a weakness within a sea of strengths.” For instance, a child with dyslexia who struggles with reading, writing and spelling may be very capable in math and science, could be a good communicator and possibly is a talented sports person, an artist or even have higher level of cognitive skills in areas of management, etc.

A common characteristic among people with learning disabilities is uneven areas of ability, “a weakness within a sea of strengths.” For instance, a child with dyslexia who struggles with reading, writing and spelling may be very capable in math and science, could be a good communicator and possibly is a talented sports person, an artist or even have higher level of cognitive skills in areas of management, etc.